Applied Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist 8th Edition by Haveles Test Bank

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Edition: 8th Edition

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Applied Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist 8th Edition by Haveles Test Bank

Chapter 01: Information Sources, Regulatory Agencies, Drug Legislation, and Prescription Writing
Haveles: Applied Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist, 8th Edition

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. Knowledge of pharmacology aids the dental professional in

  1. obtaining a patient’s health history.
  2. administering drugs in the office.
  3. handling emergency situations.
  4. selection of a nonprescription medication.
  5. All of the above

ANS: E
All of the choices are true. Because many of our patients are being treated with drugs, knowledge of pharmacology helps in understanding and interpreting patients’ responses to health history questions. Knowledge of the therapeutic and adverse effects of medications obviously helps in their proper administration in the office. Emergency situations may be caused by drugs or treated by drugs; thus, knowledge of pharmacology is of great help, especially because a rapid response is sometimes required. A clear understanding of the concepts of drug action, drug handling by the body, and drug interactions will allow the dental practitioner to make proper judgments and grasp the concepts relevant to new drug therapies on the market.

DIF: Application REF: Role of the Dental Hygienist | p. 2 & 3 OBJ: 1 TOP: NBDHE, 6.0. Pharmacology

NURSINGTB.COM

2. Which of the following statements is true regarding planning appointments?

  1. Whether or not patients are taking medication for systemic diseases is of littlethe consequence in the dental office.
  2. Asthmatic patients should have dental appointments in the morning.
  3. Diabetic patients usually have fewer problems with morning appointmentscompared with afternoon appointments.
  4. Both B and C are true.

ANS: D
Asthmatic patients who experience dental anxiety should schedule their appointments when they are not rushed or under pressure early in the morning. Diabetic patients usually have relatively fewer problems with a morning appointment. Patients taking medication for systemic diseases may require special handling in the dental office.

DIF: Comprehension
REF: Role of the Dental Hygienist (Appointment Scheduling) | p. 3 OBJ: 1 TOP: NBDHE, 6.0. Pharmacology

3. Nutritional or herbal supplements

  1. carry the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for disease states.
  2. are not drugs.
  3. can cause adverse effects.
  4. will not interact with other drugs the patient may be taking.

Applied Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist 8th Edition Haveles Test Bank

ANS: C
Nutritional or herbal supplements are quite capable of causing adverse effects. The majority of nutritional or herbal supplements do not carry FDA approval for treating disease states. These supplements are drugs and can cause adverse effects and interact with different drugs.

DIF: Comprehension
REF: Role of the Dental Hygienist (Nutritional or Herbal Supplements) | p. 3 OBJ: 1 TOP: NBDHE, 6.0. Pharmacology

4. Which type of drug name usually begins with a lowercase letter?

  1. Brand name
  2. Code name
  3. Generic name
  4. Trade name

ANS: C
Before any drug is marketed, it is given a generic name that becomes the “official” name of the drug. Each drug is assigned only one generic name selected by the U.S. Adopted Name Council, and the name is not capitalized. The brand name is equivalent to the trade name and is capitalized. Although the brand name is technically the name of the company marketing the product, this term is often used interchangeably with the trade name. The code name is the initial term used within a pharmaceutical company to refer to a drug while it is undergoing investigation and is often a combination of capital letters and numbers, the letters representing an abbreviation of the company name.

DIF: Comprehension REF: Drug Names | p. 4 OBJ: 3 TOP: NBDHE, 6.0. Pharmacology

 

5. A drug’s generic name is selected by the

  1. pharmaceutical company manufacturing it.
  2. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  3. U.S. Adopted Name Council.
  4. Federal Patent Office.

ANS: C
Each drug is assigned only one generic name (e.g., ibuprofen). It is selected by the U.S. Adopted Name Council. The generic name is not selected by the FDA or the Federal Patent Office. The pharmaceutical company manufacturing the drug clearly has an influence on the generic name given its drug, but the final decision is not the company’s.

DIF: Recall REF: Drug Names | p. 4 OBJ: 3 TOP: NBDHE, 6.0. Pharmacology

6. Which of the following is true concerning generic and trade names of drugs?

  1. A drug may only have one generic name and one trade name.
  2. A drug may only have one generic name, but it may have several trade names.
  3. A drug may have several generic names, but it may only have one trade name.
  4. A drug may have several generic names and several trade names.

ANS: B

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